Students in plaza

Great Queens: Scenes.

Oct
22
When: Friday, Oct 22, 2021, 10:00AM - 11:30AM
Attendance: Mixed Online and In-Person
Building: 310
Room: Malaspina Theatre
VIU
900 Fifth Street
Nanaimo, BC V9R 5S5

Add to CalendarGreat Queens: Scenes.10/22/2021 10:00 AM10/22/2021 11:30 AMMM/DD/YYYYAmerica/VancouverIn this creative exploration of Clytemnestra and other great queenly protagonists from the theatre, Prof. Eliza Gardiner from the Theatre Department will explore how these characters' qualities reflect and challenge the gender roles and expectations of their times. In the 5th century BCE, the ancient Greek playwright Aeschylus--sometimes called the "father of tragedy"--wrote a trilogy of plays called the Oresteia. The first installment, Agamemnon, deals with the immediate aftermath of the Trojan War. Agamemnon, commander of the Greek armies, returns home after ten long years of siege and war. The people of Argos applaud their victorious king, and his wife Clytemnestra appears to give him a warm and hospitable welcome. All is not as it seems, however. Clytemnestra has taken a lover in her husband's absence, and plans to murder Agamemnon, take up with Aegisthus, and assume the throne. She brutally stabs her husband and his new concubine to death in the bath. Clytemnestra claims that she and Aegisthus are now the rulers of Argos and that their actions have divine sanction. However, the play ends on an ominous note, with the Chorus warning that Clytemnestra's son Orestes will return from exile to avenge his father. Aeschylus' depiction of Clytemnestra tends to be viewed negatively; she is often paradoxically criticized for both her womanly qualities and for reigning too much like a man. From a more modern perspective, however, she can be seen as the epitome of an empowered, independent female ruler. In Prof. Gardiner's presentation, select dramatic scenes will be performed to explore the angst, authority, and attitudes of strong female leads who exploit and overcome a system devised to serve the patriarchy. \n\nhttps://viu.zoom.us/j/66412958287?pwd=czFuY2lXQjhZL0QvQTBJOFFkSDhmUT09\nNanaimo Campus Building 310 Room Malaspina Theatre\nVIU\n900 Fifth Street\nNanaimo BC V9R 5S5\n\nhttps://events.viu.ca/great-queens-scenes-0https://viu.zoom.us/j/66412958287?pwd=czFuY2lXQjhZL0QvQTBJOFFkSDhmUT09falseaYqCFcQpUzxLBYhTummH26494

In this creative exploration of Clytemnestra and other great queenly protagonists from the theatre, Prof. Eliza Gardiner from the Theatre Department will explore how these characters' qualities reflect and challenge the gender roles and expectations of their times.

In the 5th century BCE, the ancient Greek playwright Aeschylus--sometimes called the "father of tragedy"--wrote a trilogy of plays called the Oresteia. The first installment, Agamemnon, deals with the immediate aftermath of the Trojan War. Agamemnon, commander of the Greek armies, returns home after ten long years of siege and war. The people of Argos applaud their victorious king, and his wife Clytemnestra appears to give him a warm and hospitable welcome. All is not as it seems, however. Clytemnestra has taken a lover in her husband's absence, and plans to murder Agamemnon, take up with Aegisthus, and assume the throne. She brutally stabs her husband and his new concubine to death in the bath. Clytemnestra claims that she and Aegisthus are now the rulers of Argos and that their actions have divine sanction. However, the play ends on an ominous note, with the Chorus warning that Clytemnestra's son Orestes will return from exile to avenge his father.

Aeschylus' depiction of Clytemnestra tends to be viewed negatively; she is often paradoxically criticized for both her womanly qualities and for reigning too much like a man. From a more modern perspective, however, she can be seen as the epitome of an empowered, independent female ruler. In Prof. Gardiner's presentation, select dramatic scenes will be performed to explore the angst, authority, and attitudes of strong female leads who exploit and overcome a system devised to serve the patriarchy.